Saturday, 25 June 2022

THE PLANTS OUTSIDE MY HOUSE - LATE JUNE 2022

Purple foxglove sharing pot with Cordeline.  25th June 2022.

It's almost half way through the year. I've spent most of it either in hospital or recovering - first pneumonia, then with a broken hip. (I now have a metal one.) So . . . I have little energy and can't walk far. On the other hand, I am grateful to be alive, to be breathing and able to walk at all.

Last July, I pottered outside my house and took a look at the plants growing either side of my front door. I can manage that I thought! I'd say 'hello' and do a repeat - hoping you can't remember what was there last time because although plants vanish or die back over winter, they tend to reappear the next year - except just at the moment it isn't as sunny as it was then. In fact, this year has been pretty cold for the season and my plants have been objecting.

One of the reasons I'm glad I live where I live is that no-one minds that my plants are a mixture of recognisable garden varieties and wild plants. What counts as a 'weed' varies from location to location. At my allotment, foxgloves are frowned on. But I love foxgloves so I collected seeds from a hedgerow - and grew them on outside my house. Bees agree - they are a 'good' thing.

'Sweet Dreams' rose in pot. 25th June 2022.

Most people would accept the little 'Sweet Dreams' rose to be a 'garden' plant. It's colour is fabulous but I wish it could have a less drippy name. Last year the clusters were larger but individual flowers were smaller. Perhaps there is a reason for doing the same post a year apart. It means I note these things. The colour of the light is different too.

Unknown white wild plant sharing pot with rose. 25th June 2022.

For Christmas a year ago, I was given wild flower seeds in small clay pellets. That spring I carefully planted them in the small amount of earth I have available beside the pavement and added labels to say which insects or creatures would be likely to be attracted to them - bees, bats, hedgehogs etc. (Hedgehogs? Am I right?) None grew. But I also pressed some into pots they could share with other plants - the rose, bamboo, a little bay tree. These pellets lay inert for a year then decided to follow the example of Jack's beans in the beanstalk story. Who knew clover could be so huge? Not me! I had to hack it back before it enveloped everything. The pretty white flowers tangled in with the rose can stay for the moment. I don't know what they are but they seem to complement it. Next year I'll return to the less cluttered 'look'.

Aquilegia 'Red Hobbit'. 25th June 2022.

The aquilegia 'Red Hobbit' isn't as dramatic as in previous years. Fewer flowers per plant and they seem to be smaller. However, there are more plants so I'm not too disappointed.

Self-seeded purple candytuft. 25th June 2022.

Candytuft has self-seeded. Some white. Some purple. I shall encourage more to grow next year. It slips in happily below the tall alliums which used to be purple . . . 

Allium seed-head, 25th June 2022.

. . . and which have now turned into fireworks on stems. A bit in the way ivy does. I'm enjoying the way autumn is already beginning - before we've even got very far with our so-called summer.

At this point it started to rain. The wind sprung up and all the geranium plants began to fall of the walls and the pot with a rosemary bush began to roll lopsidedly down the street. Photography session over. This is one of the challenges with mini urban gardens. Plants which don't like too much water get too light too easily and a few gusts can rearrange the whole thing. I put away my camera and packed the pots into a cluster along the foot of the wall - stable. All colour had gone from eye level. Tomorrow, I'll put them back again. Can't think of a gardening book that mentions this.

Hi everyone!

8 comments:

Flighty said...

Hello, it's good to see you posting again. A most enjoyable, read and lovely pictures.
I like the rose, and don't mind the name. I also like Candytuft, and grow it on the plot.
Take care. xx

Laura Bloomsbury said...

I, too, was pleased to see you posting again as I've been wondering how you were - more serious health issues you seem to have surmounted and like the annuals pop up again with some alacrity. I love digitalis -the more the merrier as they do look best in close clusters

I think the mysterious white flower is yarrow - and coincidentally was used as a charm against bad luck and illness according to the WT

all the best to you x

Sue Garrett said...

I grow candytuft and foxgloves at the allotment. Could you add some stones a ballast in the bottom of your pots. It would be good for drainage too.

Natasha said...

Lovely to see you posting after a long hiatus, Lucy. Glad you are feeling better and the garden is adding so much cheer to your life.

Lovely, versatile collection of plants out there. Our summers have been a scorcher and we cant wait for the monsoons to infuse a fresh lease of life to our flowers and plants on the 15th floor. :)

Have a good week ahead!
Wishing you well and tons of good health to boot.

Hollis said...

Great to hear from you, Lucy, thanks for the photos and commentary. Best wishes!

liz said...

Oh, Lucy, I am sorry you have had such a tough year to date, health-wise, but what joy in those flowers and what variety of colour. Very best wishes for a much improved Rest of the year. Take care of yourself and send loose and leafy in Halifax updates when you can.

Granny Sue said...

So lovely to hear from you again, Lucy. I am glad you are recovering--what a year you have had. Thank you for the beautiful photos. They brightened my day.

Anonymous said...

Thoughtful and insightful as always. And very nice to have an update. The way you manage the challenges that have been sent your way is an inspiration. I agree, the white flowers look like yarrow- a plant connected to female energy. CT x